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Wednesday, October 9

  1. page Aaron Eichelberger edited ... In the above photos the techniques I used were as follows: Experiment with lighting, alter you…
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    In the above photos the techniques I used were as follows: Experiment with lighting, alter your perspective, introducing a prop, playing with eye contact, playing with emotion, and focusing on a body part.
    Project 2:For project 2, I really wanted to do something that was themed with the Fur Rondezvous. Since the ice skating show Rondy On Ice was happening and I figure skate, I thought it would be an awesome idea to take photos of the ice show. I added a twist to the photos and made them double exposures through photo shop. I really liked the photos I had taken of the guest skaters, Agnes Zawadski and Lukas Kaugars, along with a local figure skater I know, Ohna Korshin, but as soon as I made those photos double exposed, I fell in love with them. {eichelberger_doubleexposure01_copy.jpg} {eichelberger_doubleexposure02_copy.jpg} {eichelberger_DoubleExposure03_copy.jpg}
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    16, (above right)left) shows of
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    18, (above middle)right) flexin' for
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    Zawadski, 18, (above(bottom left) ending
    Project 3:
    For project 3, I decided to do senior portraits of my friend Coral. I emailed a few photographers, some nice and some not so nice, but I ended up getting a lot of excellent feedback on how to execute good senior portraits. One photographer I emailed, Marcos Gutierrez, was really helpful and gave me excellent tips on lighting, positioning, and facial expressions. I am pleased with how they turned out and my friend loved them too.
    (view changes)
    11:54 pm

Thursday, May 23

  1. page Katie Weddleton edited ... Shutter Speed - Shutter speed refers to how long the camera's shutter is open; shutterspeed ca…
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    Shutter Speed - Shutter speed refers to how long the camera's shutter is open; shutterspeed can range from as low as a 4,000th of a second to several hours. Different shutter speeds suit different scenarios, with faster shutterspeeds generally producing a very sharp product and with slow shutterspeeds capturing the subject's movement. We had three tasks for this project; first, we had to capture a completely sharp photo at a very shutterspeed. Next, we had to pan on a subject, meaning that the camera follows a moving subject so that the subject is sharp, however the background is blurred. Finally, we had to use a slow shutterspeed to capture a subject's movement. This project was initially difficult for me, but I was able to earn full credit on my second try. {weddleton_shutter01.jpg} {weddleton_shutter02.jpg} {weddleton_shutter03.jpg}
    Rule of Thirds - The rule of thirds is essentially a guideline for subject placement within the photo. Ultimately, the rule of thirds only dictates that the subject not be placed in the dead-center of the photo. This rule has certain exceptions depending on the scenario, but in general, centered subjects appear awkwardly placed. There are 24 possible locations for a focal point, including the four cross-hairs, the vertical division lines, the horizontal division lines, the left two thirds, the right two thirds, the top two thirds, and the bottom two thirds. In this project, we took an ordinary object and shot it in all of the possible locations allowed by the Rule of Thirds. I chose to photograph a clay mug, and the project turned out quite well. {Weddleton_ROT1.jpg} {Weddleton_ROT2.jpg} {Weddleton_ROT3.jpg}
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    view, whereas andany picture withusing a focal length above 85mm is a telephoto lens.using telephoto. {Weddleton_FOV1.jpg} {Weddleton_FOV2.jpg}
    Mergers - A merger is an obstruction within the photo that blocks or interferes with the view of the subject. This could be a distracting object immediately behind the subject, or flash shadows on the surface of the subject, etc. Mergers ultimately interrupt the viewers attention to the subject by instead diverting it to the said merger. This can ruin a photograph's finished look, causing the picture to seem unprofessional even from an inexperienced photographer's standpoint. Therefore, it was highly important to learn how to avoid mergers, but also to understand how they can affect a picture, which is why we took pictures both with mergers and without for this project. We even took a photograph with a "funny" merger. {weddleton_merger01.jpg} {weddleton_merger02.jpg} {weddleton_merger03.jpg}
    ISO - ISO refers to the amount of noise (or grain) present in a photograph. A high ISO will create a grainy product that is less vibrant and less sharp, so a low ISO is generally more desirable. Of course, sometimes it is necessary to use a high ISO to compensate for a low amount of light in one's surroundings.For this project we took a picture of one object at varying levels of ISO. The first picture shown has the lowest ISO, and the third picture has the highest ISO. {Weddleton_100.jpg} {Weddleton_400.jpg} {Weddleton_1600.jpg}
    (view changes)
    3:39 pm
  2. page Katie Weddleton edited ... Semester One Photography Photo 1 was essentially a course on using a digital camera correctly…
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    Semester One Photography
    Photo 1 was essentially a course on using a digital camera correctly with regards to its technical aspects. This class largely consisted of a series of short projects focusing specifically on a certain photography technique, such as aperture, light metering, ISO, etc. This course greatly enforced the class' comfort and skill using a camera, which, of course, was an essential step before the progression into photo 2.
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    the time. {Weddleton_Aperture01.jpg} {Weddleton_Aperture01.jpg} {Weddleton_Aperture02.jpg} {Weddleton_Katherine03.jpg}
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    second try. {weddleton_shutter01.jpg} {weddleton_shutter01.jpg} {weddleton_shutter02.jpg} {weddleton_shutter03.jpg}
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    awkwardly placed. There are 24 possible locations for a focal point, including the four cross-hairs, the vertical division lines, the horizontal division lines, the left two thirds, the right two thirds, the top two thirds, and the bottom two thirds. In this
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    visible backdrop. {Weddleton_FOV1.jpg}Longer focal lengths lead to higher magnification within the camera as well as a narrower angle of view. Any picture taken with a focal length under 50 mm has a wide angle of view, whereas and picture with a focal length is a telephoto lens. {Weddleton_FOV1.jpg} {Weddleton_FOV2.jpg} {Weddleton_FOV3.jpg}
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    "funny" merger. {weddleton_merger01.jpg} {weddleton_merger01.jpg} {weddleton_merger02.jpg} {weddleton_merger03.jpg}
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    highest ISO. {Weddleton_100.jpg} {Weddleton_100.jpg} {Weddleton_400.jpg} {Weddleton_1600.jpg}
    Portrait - Portraits, of course, are photographs of human subjects. Over the course of this project we studied 20 different techniques for delivering a standout portrait, which included framing the subject, filling the frame with the subject, taking the photo at an angle, etc. We had to photograph every technique, however we only turned in three of our total photographs. I chose to turn in the following three; the first is focusing in on part of the person, the second is experimenting with lighting, and the third one is obscuring part of the subject. This project was very exciting and fun for me, the first photo shown was taken below a 60th of a second, which was very disappointing. {weddleton_portrait03.jpg} {weddleton_portrait02.jpg} {weddleton_portrait01.jpg}
    Landscape - Landscape photography was of course focused on landscapes. We learned various techniques, such as when the best times of the day to shoot are, where the horizon should (or shouldn't) be placed within the frame, what the aperture should be (minimum of F16), etc. We went on a class fieldtrip to the coastal trail to get our shots, which was challenging because we all had to share three or four tripods. I was pretty disappointed with my final product, and I wish that I had taken the time to shoot outside of class.
    {weddleton_landscape02.jpg} {weddleton_landscape03.jpg} {. 079.jpg}
    Semester Two Photography
    In photo 2, we used the skills that we had developed in photo 1 to design four of our own independent projects. For my projects, I chose first to do double exposure film, then abstract photography, then fashion photography, and finally, for project four, I chose to try film for a second time.
    Project One; Double Exposure Film Photography - For project one, I decided to do double exposures with the Diana Mini, and frankly, it was a fiasco. The Diana Mini was incredible difficult to use, especially with my huge lack of experience using film. I can't even explain why some of my photos turned out the way that they did, but luckily, I was able to do a lot in photoshop to hide some of the most garish errors.
    {Weddleton_doubleexposure05.JPG} {Weddleton_doubleexposure03.jpg} {Weddleton_doubleexposure02.jpg}
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    on glass. {weddleton_glass01.jpg} {weddleton_glass01.jpg} {weddleton_glass04.jpg}
    Project Three; Fashion Photography - For fashion photography, I traveled around Anchorage to find places with graffiti to use as a backdrop for my shots. This created neat photos, however it was very uncomfortable shooting in these areas just because of the parts of town where they were located. Because of this, the photoshoot was very rushed, which I believe was apparent in my final product. Overall, though, fashion photography was a neat experience, and if there were a project five, I would probably try fashion again. {weddleton_fasion01.jpg} {weddleton_fashion02.jpg}
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    it by. {washingtondc {washingtondc 002.jpg} {washingtondc
    Photoshop Tutorials
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    of photo. {before_blemish.jpg} {before_blemish.jpg} {after_blemish.jpg}
    Masking Layers - For this assignment, we were supposed to choose a specific portion of the photo to alter without altering the rest of the picture. I chose to use one of my pictures from the color assignment and to change the color of the subject. I changed the color from orange, which is my least favorite color, to purple, which is one of my favorites.
    {maskinglayers_before.jpg} {maskinglayers_after.jpg}
    (view changes)
    3:35 pm
  3. file . 079.jpg uploaded
    3:31 pm
  4. page Katie Weddleton edited ... Mergers - A merger is an obstruction within the photo that blocks or interferes with the view …
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    Mergers - A merger is an obstruction within the photo that blocks or interferes with the view of the subject. This could be a distracting object immediately behind the subject, or flash shadows on the surface of the subject, etc. Mergers ultimately interrupt the viewers attention to the subject by instead diverting it to the said merger. This can ruin a photograph's finished look, causing the picture to seem unprofessional even from an inexperienced photographer's standpoint. Therefore, it was highly important to learn how to avoid mergers, but also to understand how they can affect a picture, which is why we took pictures both with mergers and without for this project. We even took a photograph with a "funny" merger. {weddleton_merger01.jpg} {weddleton_merger02.jpg} {weddleton_merger03.jpg}
    ISO - ISO refers to the amount of noise (or grain) present in a photograph. A high ISO will create a grainy product that is less vibrant and less sharp, so a low ISO is generally more desirable. Of course, sometimes it is necessary to use a high ISO to compensate for a low amount of light in one's surroundings.For this project we took a picture of one object at varying levels of ISO. The first picture shown has the lowest ISO, and the third picture has the highest ISO. {Weddleton_100.jpg} {Weddleton_400.jpg} {Weddleton_1600.jpg}
    ...
    which was very disappointing. {weddleton_portrait03.jpg}
    Landscape - Landscape photography was of course focused on landscapes. We learned various techniques, such as when the best times of the day to shoot are, where the horizon should (or shouldn't) be placed within the frame, what the aperture should be (minimum of F16), etc. We went on a class fieldtrip to the coastal trail to get our shots, which was challenging because we all had to share three or four tripods. I was pretty disappointed with my final product, and I wish that I had taken the time to shoot outside of class.
    Semester Two Photography
    In photo 2, we used the skills that we had developed in photo 1 to design four of our own independent projects. For my projects, I chose first to do double exposure film, then abstract photography, then fashion photography, and finally, for project four, I chose to try film for a second time.
    Project One; Double Exposure Film Photography - For project one, I decided to do double exposures with the Diana Mini, and frankly, it was a fiasco. The Diana Mini was incredible difficult to use, especially with my huge lack of experience using film. I can't even explain why some of my photos turned out the way that they did, but luckily, I was able to do a lot in photoshop to hide some of the most garish errors.
    {Weddleton_doubleexposure05.JPG} {Weddleton_doubleexposure03.jpg} {Weddleton_doubleexposure02.jpg}
    Project Two; Abstract Photography - In project two, I had originally wanted to create polar planets from panorama shots, however technical difficulties got in the way and I had to resort to desperate measures by entirely starting my project over from scratch. I instead chose to do abstract photography focusing on glass. {weddleton_glass01.jpg} {weddleton_glass04.jpg}
    Project Three; Fashion Photography - For fashion photography, I traveled around Anchorage to find places with graffiti to use as a backdrop for my shots. This created neat photos, however it was very uncomfortable shooting in these areas just because of the parts of town where they were located. Because of this, the photoshoot was very rushed, which I believe was apparent in my final product. Overall, though, fashion photography was a neat experience, and if there were a project five, I would probably try fashion again. {weddleton_fasion01.jpg} {weddleton_fashion02.jpg}
    (view changes)
    3:20 pm
  5. page Codie Cope edited Codie Cope's Photography Portfolio Photo 1- In photo 1, we learned the basics of photography and…
    Codie Cope's Photography Portfolio
    Photo 1- In photo 1, we learned the basics of photography and how to use every part of the camera, such as changing the aperture to change how much is in focus, and shutter speed to capture motion or to freeze something in place.
    Aperture-
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    Shutter Speed-
    This was the next project, we had to take three photos, one with a high shutter speed to freeze a subject in place. The next with a slow shutter speed, to capture motion. The last was panning, we had to lower our shutter speed to 1/30 of a second and move the camera with the subject, in my case it was the
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    a tripod. To shoot something in motion, especially when you want it to be sharp, go to a 1/250 of a second or higher.
    {Cope_Shutter01.jpg} {Cope_Print.jpg} {Cope_Shutter03.jpg}
    Rule of Thirds-
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    your subject. On my photos, from left to right, I put my subject is the top-middle box, the right two-thirds and the right-middle box.
    {Cope_ROT1.jpg} {Cope_ROT2.jpg} {Cope_ROT3.jpg}
    Field of View-
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    {Cope_UrbanHDR1.jpg} {Cope_UrbanHDR2.jpg} {Cope_UrbanHDR3.jpg}
    Project 3-
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    came out. I chose to do rural instead of urban, is because I love camping and staying in my cabin during the summer time. We had to mat and mount this project for Treftpunkt's First Friday.
    {Cope_HDR01.jpg} {Cope_HDR02.jpg} {Cope_HDR03.jpg}
    Project 4-
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    them. I shot two rolls of film, and only had
    {Cope_Diptych01.jpg} {Cope_Diptych02.jpg} {Cope_Diptych03.jpg}
    Photoshop Tutorial-
    (view changes)
    11:23 am
  6. page Alexa Stanley edited ... {Stanley_Apeture03.jpg} {Stanley_Apeture02.jpg} {Stanley_Apeture01.jpg} Shutter speed: .…
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    {Stanley_Apeture03.jpg} {Stanley_Apeture02.jpg} {Stanley_Apeture01.jpg}
    Shutter speed:
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    a second. For example 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, 1/2000, 1/4000, 1/8000. Each speed increment halves the amountPanning is a big part of light. With the appropriate shutter speedthis as well, you can control the motion in a photo. A slow shutter speed will blur parts of an image capturing the movement, wheremust always use a fast shutter speed will stoptripod to keep the image in it's tracks.picture as clear as possible.
    {Stanley_shutterspeed 01.jpg} {Stanley_shutterspeed 02.jpg} {Stanley_shutterspeed03.jpg}
    Rule Of Thirds:
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    {387066-R1-09-19A.jpg} {Deborah.jpg} {387066-R1-14-4A.jpg}
    Photo Shop Tutorials:
    Photoshop is a highly used tool I use in my projects, it's really helped me in all my photos by perfecting them,
    One: "Selecting Portions Of An Image" This is where you take a portion of an original image, "one part", then merge it with a different photograph and or background by using the wand tool and inter-versing it.
    {stanley_tutorial02.jpg} {stanley_tutorial01.jpg}
    (view changes)
    10:21 am
  7. page Hector Quiroz edited ... http://quiroz-hector.wix.com/quirozfashionphoto Photoshop Tutorials: ... as possible. B…
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    http://quiroz-hector.wix.com/quirozfashionphoto
    Photoshop Tutorials:
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    as possible.
    Brightness

    Brightness
    & Contrast:
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    from the brightest.
    {quiroz_before.JPG} {quiroz_after.JPG}
    Dodging & Burning: The dodge tool is used to brighten certain parts of an image without affecting the whole picture. The burn tool darkens portions of an image.
    brightest
    {quiroz_before.JPG} {quiroz_after.JPG}
    Dodging & Burning: The dodge tool is used to brighten certain parts of an image without affecting the whole picture. The burn tool darkens portions of an image {quiroz_before11.jpg} {quiroz_after11.jpg}
    Blemishes: This tutorial shows you how fix blemishes in your picture. You can fix scars, acne, misplaced strands of hair, etc… There are several ways to do this, but my favorite is the healing brush tool.
    {quiroz_before00.jpg} {quiroz_after00.jpg}
    (view changes)
    10:21 am

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